Tag Archives: Colorado SR22

State By State Minimum Auto Insurance Requirements

State-by-State Minimum Coverage Requirements

All states have financial responsibility laws that either explicitly or in effect require you to purchase at least some auto insurance. Although coverage requirements vary from state to state, you will typically need to buy some level of liability coverage. Other types of auto insurance coverage may be optional or required, depending on the state in which you live.

Auto insurance coverage: the basics

Auto insurance coverage is typically broken down into separate components:

  • Liability coverage: This provides protection for claims made against an insured, where the use of an insured vehicle caused bodily injury or property damage to someone else
  • Medical payments coverage or personal injury protection: This provides coverage for various medical expenses incurred by the insured and others as a result of an accident, regardless of negligence or liability on the part of the insured
  • Collision coverage: This provides coverage for losses that the insured suffers as a result of damage to his or her covered vehicle caused by a collision
  • Other-than-collision (also known as comprehensive) coverage: This provides coverage for losses that the insured suffers as a result of damage to or loss of a covered vehicle not caused by a collision (e.g., fire, theft, vandalism, falling objects, explosion, earthquake, flood, and civil commotion)
  • Uninsured motorist coverage: This provides coverage for losses that the insured and others sustain when injured through the negligence of an uninsured or unidentified hit-and-run motorist
  • Underinsured motorist coverage: This provides coverage for losses that the insured and others sustain when injured through the negligence of a motorist who has liability insurance, but the limit of that insurance is insufficient to pay for damages

State-by-state minimum coverage requirements

The following table provides up-to-date information on each state’s minimum coverage requirements. The first two figures refer to bodily injury liability limits, and the third figure refers to the property damage liability limit. For example, 20/40/10 means coverage up to $20,000 for each person injured in an accident, up to a maximum of $40,000 for the entire accident, and $10,000 worth of coverage for property damage. The state minimums are based on the most current information available. You should check your specific state requirements to verify these figures.

State Type(s) of Coverage Required Minimum Liability Limits
AL Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
AK Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 50/100/25
AZ Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 15/30/10
AR Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
CA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 15/30/5
CO Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/15
CT Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist 20/40/10
DE Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 15/30/10
DC Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/10
FL Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 10/20/10
GA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
HI Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 20/40/10
ID Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/15
IL Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 20/40/15
IN Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/10
IA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 20/40/15
KS Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/10
KY Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 25/50/10
LA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 15/30/25
ME Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist 50/100/25
MD Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 20/40/15
MA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 20/40/5
MI Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 20/40/10
MN Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist 30/60/10
MS Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
MO Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/10
MT Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/10
NE Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
NV Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 15/30/10
NH Financial Responsibility Only, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/25
NJ Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability (Standard Limits Shown), Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 15/30/5
NM Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/10
NY Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/10
NC Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 30/60/25
ND Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/25
OH Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 12.5/25/7.5
OK Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
OR Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/10
PA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 15/30/5
RI Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/25
SC Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/25
SD Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/25
TN Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/15
TX Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/25
UT Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Personal Injury Protection 25/65/15
VT Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist 25/50/10
VA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 25/50/20
WA Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/10
WV Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, Uninsured Motorist 20/40/10
WI Financial Responsibility Only, Uninsured Motorist 50/100/15
WY Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability 25/50/20

Is the minimum coverage required enough coverage?

Keep in mind that the figures given in the preceding table represent only required minimums. In many cases, it will be in your best interest to purchase coverage above and beyond the minimums (including collision and other than collision) so that you’re adequately protected. With bodily injury liability, for instance, most insurance professionals recommend that your coverage limits be at least $100,000 per person and $300,000 per accident.

Top Questions Regarding an SR22 Insurance Policy

What is an SR22?

An SR-22 is simply a car insurance company’s guarantee to the state that you are carrying the legally mandated coverage. An SR-22 by itself does not raise your insurance rates. Rather, it is the conviction that triggered the requirement– usually a DUI, driving without insurance or reckless driving — that causes your premiums to soar.

Many motorists mistakenly believe the SR-22 is an actual type of car insurance, but that’s not the case. The SR-22 is simply a form that your car insurance company files on your behalf with the state.

The form, usually filed electronically, provides the state with proof of financial responsibility by showing that you have the required insurance coverages in effect.  The state-mandated coverages may be the same as your state’s minimum liability requirements or different coverages with higher limits.   The exact auto insurance requirements differ from state to state.

You can get your SR-22 only from a car insurance company because the purpose of the form is to show that you have obtained, and will maintain, certain insurance coverage.  There is no other way to get the SR-22; you cannot get an SR-22 without buying a car insurance policy.

Why am I required to carry an SR22?

All states except Delaware, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania may require a driver to obtain a SR-22.

Some of the reasons your state may require an SR-22 certificate of financial responsibility include, but aren’t limited to, the following:

  • Failure to carry liability insurance on your vehicle
  • Conviction for driving without insurance
  • Driving uninsured and being involved in a motor vehicle accident
  • DUI, DWI or other major alcohol offense convictions
  • Serious moving violation (such as reckless driving) convictions
  • Accumulating too many DMV points
  • Being termed a habitual traffic offender
  • Needing to apply for a hardship or probationary permit (while license is suspended)
  • Reinstating your license after a suspension or revocation

 

Colorado SR22 Insurance

If you are required to file an SR22 for the state of Colorado contact an insurance company or agent who is licensed to sell insurance in Colorado. You will be required to carry state minimum liability limits and continue the insurance policy for the duration of your specific court requirement.

Most insurance companies will electronically submit your SR22 to the Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles. You can deliver the form in person to 1881 Pierce Street in Lakewood, Colorado.

Do not let the insurance policy lapse or cancel as the provider will notify the state and your license will be suspended again. The SR22 is an add-on to a standard auto insurance policy that guarantees the state will be notified of any change in status and is commonly referred to as a future financial responsibility filing. You can change insurance companies but be sure to get a new SR22 filed before the old one is cancelled.

Handcuff Picturehttps://www.sr22coverage.com/what-is-sr22-insurance/sr22-by-state-2/colorado-sr22-insurance/

What violations require an SR-22 filing?

Below are a list of violations that may require you to file an SR22 with the department of motor vehicles. This is not an exhaustive list but includes the most common violations:

  • Failure to drive with proper liability insurance
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs
  • Refusal to take chemical BAC test
  • Failure to pay child support
  • Vehicular homicide or vehicular assault conviction

What if I cancel my SR-22 insurance prior to the end of my probation   period?

If you let your SR-22 insurance policy lapse or cancel it prior to the end of your probation period the insurance company will notify the state immediately. Once the state is notified your driver’s license will be suspended until you reinstate the SR22 and your probation period will start over. It is in your best interest to maintain the SR22 policy so you don’t pay any additional fees. For the lowest prices in the State of Colorado, call 1-855-678-6977 or access our FREE Quoting Engine!